National medical care is not hard

This is why national health care plans always win out over our ridiculous greed-driven plan.

Just imagine you go in for a checkup and the doc gives you bad news. You have a cancer. Fortunately, it’s treatable. She schedules you for a CT scan and a number of other tests. You are scheduled to see an oncologist, who will be in charge of your case. You go in. The oncologist reviews your CT and your lab tests, and establishes a series of treatments that include the very latest developments. She consults with a nearby teaching hospital, which gives you a series of injections and medications that make your own body attack your cancer. After a number of treatments you are returned to health. Your oncologist monitors your health for years after your treatment. For this extensive and expensive medical care you pay nothing out of pocket.

Who gets paid, and how much? Everyone is paid a salary. Nobody gets money for scheduling extra tests. Nobody gets more for scheduling extra appointments. Or for prescribing a particular drug. Nobody’s salary is ridiculously huge; nobody’s is too low. The technologists and administrative personnel are also salaried. There are far fewer administrators because there are no insurance companies to pay. All pay follows a government pay scale, with adjustments according to locale, with extra pay in occupations and in places where there is extra need. All personnel earn more with longer service and more advanced expertise.

The government pays off the educational debt of newly minted physicians. They do not need insurance, because the government treats all conditions, including bad outcomes, and accommodates patients who were injured by their treatment. Each doc’s practice is monitored by government agencies, and extra training is required in the case of deficiencies. The government requires continued training to keep them up to date.

Every person in the country receives unlimited medical care paid through taxes. Health care workers are salaried, and all products, including medicines, are not allowed to be exorbitant as at present.

Is national health care free, as we so often hear? Of course not. It’s paid for through our taxes. But paying for it through taxes means it costs 50% of the market-driven cost we pay now.

Here are some of the reasons we pay so much now. Docs graduate with enormous education debt, which requires them to earn a high salary from the first. They also pay huge malpractice insurance premiums. The technologists in their service are paid moderately. The many administrative personnel who are required to manage the massive paperwork required by the insurance companies are paid the least the system can get away with.

But insurance companies are the biggest reason our health care costs so much. Insurance companies try to minimize all services in order to maximize profit for their shareholder owners. They pay full time people to disallow medical care. They may disallow expensive tests. They may refuse to pay for the treatments the doctor requests. They may refuse to renew any patient’s insurance, or even pay for treatment if the patient’s condition is presumed to exist prior to signing on to their insurance plan, or even if they decide it’s too expensive. Their upper executives are paid tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars every year. Stockholders expect a significant return on their investment.

The result is that our healthcare costs literally double what other countries pay. Double! Moreover, the quality and success rate of our medical care is inferior to many others, not to mention that many Americans have no insurance at all, and their health suffers for it. Lack of insurance often results in medical bankruptcy, or death from untreated conditions.

And yet conservative Republicans will not even consider proven superior systems. Why? Mostly because that would remove the possibility for the top administrative officers to become billionaires, and it is Republican dogma that says making the rich still more rich will somehow benefit the country. In spite of years of claims to the contrary, Republicans simply do not have a viable plan for health care. That is because they insist on a for-profit capitalist plan, and not a single dollar of the billions spent on for-profit insurance goes toward medical care of any kind.

The real purpose of our present plan is to maximize profit and executive pay.